2006 Chesapeake Bay Bridge Walk

 
From the southern span, we got a good view of the northern span that was carrying traffic in both directions. This is the cantilever bridge near the eastern shore that crosses the secondary shipping channel. Although the northern bridge design is quite different from the southern bridge, it's still a cantilever bridge. If you saw the bridge in half at its midpoint and magically remove the far half of the bridge, the near half would remain standing. You couldn't do that with an arch bridge; the whole thing would collapse and fall into the water. You can click on this picture to enlarge it; use your browser's "back" command to return here.   Here's a closer view of all the boats passing under the cantilever bridge of the northern span. You can just make out a tall ship in the background, which I think is Clipper City from Baltimore. This tall ship was allowed to travel in the main shipping channel and pass under the suspension bridges, since I guess it couldn't fit under the cantilever bridges.

 
Two views of a recreational boat passing under the cantilever bridge of the northern span.

 
This is the suspension bridge for the northern span, which passes over the main shipping channel. According to a navigation chart for Chesapeake Bay, the suspension bridges provide 182 feet of vertical clearance for passing ships (the cantilever bridges provide 58 feet of vertical clearance). You can click on this picture to enlarge it; use your browser's "back" command to return here.   The sponsors provided drinking water at several places along the route. The water came from a huge tanker truck filled with spring water that was hooked up to a row of interconnected water fountains. It was a pretty clever arrangement.

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