Sailing To New York City

Sailing Up The Coast Of New Jersey (continued)

 
Jesse sitting on the coachroof on a beautiful sunny day. Click on either picture to see a bigger version; use your browser's "back" command to return here.

 
Looking out at the nearly featureless Atlantic Ocean. It's not quite featureless because there's a red buoy in the distance, barely visible at the center of the horizon.  

We had fine weather in the morning and afternoon, so we sailed pleasurably for hours. Because of the wind direction, we couldn't go directly up the coast of New Jersey, but instead had to steer off to the east. Jerome's plan was to continue heading offshore until some time later in the day when we could tack and make New York Harbor on the new tack. If that works out, we'll be able to complete the whole passage with only a single tack.

Jerome was really excited to be sailing on the ocean, at one point exclaiming "JeeZUS, this is FAAbulous!" He has devoted the past two years of his life to the difficult and expensive process of finding and refitting a cruising sailboat. So much time, so much effort, so many questions and details, worked out painstakingly and at great expense, to get to this moment: Pilgrim, his sailboat and home, cruising effortlessly on the wide blue ocean. In fact, this is probably the first time the boat has been out on the ocean, and it's been a long time coming.

Off the coast of New Jersey, I was surprised that there were relatively few seabirds. I saw a few gulls which were floating, not flying, and every now and then saw what might have been a gannet (which looks like a booby but isn't).

Later on, we passed through an area that had a series of small floating marker buoys ending with a float that looked like a beach ball. We were well off the coast in deep water, so you normally wouldn't worry about running into things (like crab pot floats, etc.), but I was at the helm and had to dodge the boat around a couple of floats, which was a minor nuisance.


 
The apparent wind indicator, showing that we're sailing pretty close to the wind on port tack. The wind speed indicates zero because that part of the indicator doesn't work.  


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